The Responsive Enterprise

The Responsive Enterprise: Capitalizing on Disruptive Change

To begin with, we highlight six elements that are common to responsive organizations. These provide a strong foundation that will enable companies to survive and even thrive in a sea change of technology, competition, and customer needs. Read more »

The New Mindsets of Marketing, Sales, and Service Executives

Marketing, sales, and service leaders must internalize six key beliefs – in continual customer feedback, faster decision-making, cross-functional skills, the importance of digital channels, corporate transparency, and reliance on data – to enable customer-centric transformation. Read more »

Operational Changes for Customer-Facing Functions

We highlight why an agile operations and delivery approach is essential. It requires an integrated strategy for IT, organizational change management, and business process redesign, which is focused on continuously applying data-driven insights to make operational changes.Read more »

Reinventing Innovation for a World of Continuous Market Feedback

Social media allows digital customers to share their experiences instantly, with large audiences. Organizations can promote listening, externally and internally, by building elements such as new software platforms, cross-functional teams, better data analytics, and a culture of listening.Read more »

Reinventing the Supply Chain for a Digital World

Supply chain management should evolve to respond faster, not just to black swan events but also to small, frequent changes. Companies need to manage supply chain data more frequently, at a more precise level. Data from the Internet of Things (IoT), advanced analytics, and simulation technologies can play important roles. Read more »

The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists

Data science talent has become a competitive differentiator. We analyze three common organizational approaches for structuring the data science team and suggest how to identify the right one based on business goals. Read more »

A Cure for Complexity

Business model innovation is a strategic capability that is essential to manage the disruption caused by competitors with innovative, digital products and services. This requires strategic and cultural change, adequate funding, as well as ideas sourced from a ‘digital ecosystem’ of employees, customers, academia, and even competitors. Read more »

Preparing for Disruptive Competition

Business model innovation is a strategic capability that is essential to manage the disruption caused by competitors with innovative, digital products and services. This requires strategic and cultural change, adequate funding, as well as ideas sourced from a ‘digital ecosystem’ of employees, customers, academia, and even competitors. Read more »

Shifting IT Delivery into High Speed

To remain competitive, companies must be able to evaluate and implement rapidly evolving technologies exponentially faster than in the past. Traditional ‘waterfall’ or ‘two-speed IT’ approaches fall short and companies need to adopt a faster, agile approach for all systems development. Read more »

Sense and Respond: Finding the New Technologies that Really Matter

The rapid expansion in technology companies and startups, and the impact of Social media, Mobile, Big Data and Analytics, Cloud Computing, and the Internet of Things has made it imperative for companies to identify technologies that can potentially improve or transform their business. A ‘sense and respond’ approach can help to rapidly identify, test, and implement successful technologies. Read more »

First Substantiation, Then Transformation

Corporate transformations often fail when leaders do not adequately substantiate the need for change. This requires building an irrefutable argument supported by facts, providing positive motivation, communicating clearly internally, and learning from practices outside the industry. Read more »

The Fourth Listening Post 

Using Social and Other Data to Revitalize the Customer Experience

Digital trends have driven commoditization and consumerization across every industry, eradicating many of the historical advantages in product, packaging, pricing and positioning. Read more »

Why So Much Omnichannel Dogma is Wrong

WhileCompaniesNeedManyChannelstoReachAllCustomers,EachCustomer Tends to Prefer Only One or Two

While companies need many channels to reach all customers, each customer tends to prefer only one or two. Also, customer experience expectations change from channel to channel. Read more »

Preparing for the Wearable Customer Experience

Wearables may be the first wave of digital technologies that promise to revolutionize the customer experience, again. Companies should be evaluating if, how, and when they will incorporate this technology. Read more »

Architecting the New Customer Experience

To provide customers with a sophisticated set of digital tools for interaction across all its channels, companies must carefully design their technology infrastructure. How do we build such flexible IT architectures for three types of customer experience initiatives: omnichannel, systems of engagement, and Salesforce.com. Read more »

  1. The Omnichannel Architecture

    Why Companies Need a Technology Blueprint to Make a Cross-Channel Experience Excel
    Many companies see the ability to deliver an omnichannel customer experience as their future. But the best experience design will only be as good as how well the underlying technologies are organized and connected. Read more »

  2. Architecting Technology That Customers Embrace

    Next-generation architectures must also help companies gain deep knowledge about each and every customer—who they are, what they like to buy and when, how they like to buy, what influences their purchases, and much more. Read more »

  3. Connecting to Customers Through the Ever- Expanding World of Machines

    Companies need an it architecture that lets them engage not only with customers but also with the products they buy. Read more »

Finding the Right Organizational Design for Your Customer Experience

Do not let silos sink your customer experience; break through the walls without tearing them down

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Getting Started

Executive Checklist for Customer Experience Transformation.

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  1. Assessing the Customer Experience

    To improve interactions with customers, start by rigorously diagnosing what customers expect and the capabilities you have to deliver it. Read more »

  2. Designing the Aspirational Customer Experience

    After Gaining New Insights on What Customers Expect, Companies Must Translate Them Into an Experience That Works. Read more »

  3. Is the New Experience Working?

    The key is knowing what to measure, how often, and the best sources of data. Read more »